Plant Sex Organs - NSFW



  • Ever the provocative provocateur... Yeowwzzaaahh!

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  • @toby That's a prickly subject....



  • @L-Aura

    Ha! Hence the NSFW warning. Although the "Botany" tag kind of spoils it... 🌻



  • OK. I will play. Here's a photo of Elegant Brodiaea. I have never seen so many in northern California. It's a banner year for this species.

    elegant brodea.jpg

    After the Bachar memorial potluck we stayed with a good friend who got me in touch with the photographer of many great wildflower field guides, Stephan Ingram. I bought 2 books off him, Cacti, Agaves, and Yuccas of California and Nevada and a small flower book for Rock Creek area authored by, Cathy Rose who learned from the late great Carl Sharsmith. I recommend both and highly recommend the Cactus field guide.



  • The wild iris fields outside of Bridgeport are stunning this year. The common name; Western Blue Flag; scientific name; Iris missouriensis

    Matterhorn and iris field.JPG

    Photo from Twin Lakes road just off 395.
    I am adhering to resizing all my offerings to just under 2MB and they only look diminished if using any zoom.



  • @Alfalfa Nice! Cool that you got the Genus capitalized and species lower cased. Bonus points for adding italics 😉 👍

    As for the 2MB... Yeah, I wanted to have nice photos. Things still look pretty darn good in most cases at 500K - 1MB. Most folks access via mobile devices nowadays so they don't get to the full grandeur! I've yet to scope any images on an HD TV screen but expect they should be pretty good? Nor a 4K monitor. I'm on a 2560 x 1440 display and they seem pretty dandy to me (entry level Eizo - even w/o adjusting for sRGB).



  • I know it as a "Lily Pad" & I'm ok with that

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    `
    but don't mind learning what beyond "Pond Lily" to call these

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  • No idea what this is, but it's thriving on the south side of the house.

    Plant.jpg



  • @David-Harris Just taking a guess as not there up close and also not an expert but definitely a yucca and I think Chaparral Yucca Hesperoyucca whipplei, also known as western yucca native from Monterey Co. south along coast to Baja and inland in SEKI foothills down through all the transverse ranges of so Cal.
    After all I just bought this bitchin book from the author in Bishop, 'Cacti, Agaves, and Yuccas of California and Nevada.



  • @Alfalfa You may well be right. I have no clue.

    Well, the one clue I can offer is that this plant is thriving just a bit north of the
    49th parallel. Yes, in BC, but just north of the border in the area known as "the sunshine coast."

    That, and the fact that the central stalk did a Jack-and-the-Beanstalk thing, rising from nothing to over 6 feet in about 20 days.



  • @The-Gnome I am in northern Cal and only know Yellow Pond lily Nuphar lutea ssp (sub-species) polysepala. I don't know east coast flora well enough to ponder but saw the same species in Prospect Park, Brooklyn and Central Park, Manhattan this spring so it may be a garden variety cultivar which is the appropriate usage of italics iirc.



  • @David-Harris definitely a yucca in the agave family all known for the plant not flowering for years and then shooting up a flower stalk that grows 3 inches per day. My illustration from floral artist E.O. Murman (1874 - 1962) is a perfect match. I will photograph image and download assuming not copyright issue.

    20190702_205027.jpg



  • I initially thought Yucca whipplie as well but upon closer inspection did not look quite right. But then also been many years since I've been in chaparral habitats.

    But then I had also never witnessed an inflorescence this tall on one in the real either so I likely stand corrected. That reminds me more of a "Century Plant", genus species of which I forget.

    @Alfalfa I think for purposes of critique and commentary we are probably okay with a single image, especially since you included an attribution and not claiming as your work. The image I linked to above include such and licensed under "Creative Commons" from wikimedia.

    @David-Harris About six to eight feet seems more congruent with my recollections.

    P.S.; The petals are "edible" but taste pretty "raspy". Sample the younger ones if so inclined. Moth pollinated, hence the white flowers. Indigenous tribes used the fibrous portions to make rope and soap, iirc.

    Two other common Yuccas:

    1. Yucca schidigera; lower elevation deserts, more fibrous and thicker/stout leaves.
    2. Yucca brevifolia; higher elevation deserts, the Joshua Trees many of us know and love from a very special place.


  • @toby to quote above mentioned book , "agave readily distinguished from yuccas by inferior ovary, succulent spine tip leaves and spiny teeth along the leaf margins.

    The image from B.C., just north of the 49th P shows a clean leaf margin with no spines so I am staying with yucca. It may not be Mr Whipple but it is indeed a yucca and not an agave. All the photos of agave flowers that I can find show an abundance of visible stamens, lacking in yucca flowers which display luxurious fruiting flowers such as found in Joshua trees in season. The large moths that pollinate yuccas are very different from the pollinators of agaves. I could go on. Someone please shoot me.



  • you want sex organs, here you go! got these last year and am going out every weekend now in the Bishop area. Not sure whether to post here or Random Photos. This thread has an odd title and may not attract as many viewers...

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  • @skiroc Wow! A couple of cool nature books Iike to have in Bishop area; 'Rock Creek Wildflowers' Cathy Rose, photos by Stephen Ingram issued by California Native Plant Society, 'Wildflowers of the Eastern Sierra' by Laird Blackwell issued by Lone Pine Press and 'The Laws Field Guide to the Sierra Nevada', written and illustrated by John Muir Laws and issued by California Academy of Sciences.



  • @skiroc said in Plant Sex Organs - NSFW:

    you want sex organs, here you go! got these last year and am going out every weekend now in the Bishop area. Not sure whether to post here or Random Photos. This thread has an odd title and may not attract as many viewers...

    Either thread works. Choose whichever most suits your fancy. I would prefer "ornamental" shots be posted in the Random Photo thread though and reserve this thread for native species (which is actually kind of lame when I think about it because ornamentals are still native to somewhere...).

    As for the "inspiration" behind the thread's title:

    • This being a "Climber Forum" I was not sure how much latitude was "acceptable" in the Random Photo Thread and I did not want to go too far afield and "clutter" it with botany pics.

    • "Plant Sex Organs" is actually a pretty functional description of a flower. I've only enrolled in two botany courses and the term was commonly used in both. That was California back in the 80's though so maybe things are more prudish nowadays.

    • Botany courses typically involve a lot of memorization. Mnemonics which are a bit "outrageous" stick better and it seems sexually suggestive stuff was the order or the day. Interestingly the estrogen driven often coined the most suggestive and descriptive.

    • Once you get past the memorization and into the ecology, pollination and seed dispersal mechanisms bring even greater focus to the functional, as contrasted with aesthetic, aspect of flowers.

    • I did not want to limit content of this thread to photographs, but to also potentially include broader discussion of native plant ecology.

    • My perhaps lame sense of humor and maybe a small dig at overly draconian content filters.

    Be all that as it may, I am happy to change this thread's title to be less "provocative " and more descriptive. Perhaps "Native Plant Botany" thread?

    P.S.; Check out those anthers on both of those shots. Pretty obvious each favors different pollination mechanisms, no?



  • OK. I'll play. I confess my worthless college degree (at the time & place I graduated) was in Forest Management. My favorite courses touched on wildland ecology & of course we did have rote memorization of a lot of latin names. Some, surprisingly, still stick with me 50 years late.

    So here's a double delight, beetles copulating on lupine.
    Wind_01_073-small.jpg

    And last week in Nevada desert, what I think is a species of Beeplant.

    IMG_0208.JPG

    And then, in Nevada's Kern Mountains, Lupine-mania.
    IMG_0274.JPG



  • @FritzRay those different colored lupines are pretty cool. Thanks for playing!
    EDIT; In botany and birding, you can never rest on your laurels. Whatever scientific name you learned in the past may have changed once or twice since the advent of gene sequencing- DNA which has often shown that appearances are deceiving and plants and birds once thought to be closely related are now being re-evaluated and thrown into new Genus and species. My 20 year old botany and bird field guides are useful but most have been replaced because my actual job depends on me being up on the most recent changes plus I am a nerd just interested in this shit.



  • Two things:

    First, regarding the title of this thread, how about "Sex Pistils"?

    Second, for those who identified my mystery plant as a yucca, here's a shot of the lower part. Should confirm (or deny) your identification....

    Yucca... or not.jpg


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