National History Day - The 1960's



  • My ninth grade niece did a "website" on the 1960's for National History Day. Not really an actual website but embedded w/in their platform and associated NHD constraints:

    https://site.nhd.org/21372567/home

    Maybe some of y'all will find this of interest? Maybe not.... 🐕



  • Very interesting. Why? Because, in 2021 (and for at least since 2015), the 1960s have been dismissed as a sort of cultural black hole memorable only because that was when the hated Boomer generation grew up.

    Nothing good came out of the 60s. Boomers are responsible for everything that is wrong with the world.

    Your ninth-grade niece (and whoever helped her with the writing) did a much-needed service to the world in pointing out that, whatever the majority of the boomer generation (bunch of losers) did with the rest of their lives, some of us back then kickstarted some much-needed change.

    This leftover hippie gives her an A+



  • @David-Harris Mia's a "reasonably bright" young lass. Enjoys and tends to do well on project based learning. Thanks for your kind words.



  • I like it. I frequent some sites like "growing up in {San Diego, Chula Vista,}, high school alumni pages {1962-1968}.



  • @zBrown I found it interesting how she viewed/presented it thru the lens of marketing and ads. Hard to recall the days when multiple TV's were not in every home. Or when folks gathered where they were to see/hear the "news" and such. The effect of this advertising on a previously naive population is kind of akin with the emergence of the Internet and social media on later generations. The wave following the early adopters is ripe for exploitation. Subsequent gens who grow up with it wise up considerably.

    And then there is the whole question of whether marketing leads or follows/reflects culture, values, etc. I was a few years behind the "hippies" so kind of experienced all that vicariously, as painted by "the media". I figured some of the folks a bit older hereabouts might have found this piece interesting if for naught else than how such a pivotal piece of history is viewed by the gen, what, Z'ers?


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