New Routing



  • @NickG said in New Routing:

    IMG_6507.jpg
    Isa's camera took a 70m ride....

    At least its last pic was a memorable one. 📷 👍



  • @NickG Well done!



  • @toby that shot was my camera 110m off the deck..



  • A few photos from another day of new-routing in the Pacific Southwest (i.e. just north of your Pacific Northwest).

    It starts with a drive to the end of the road. You can tell it's the end of the road because others who have tried to go further have left clues.
    End of the road.jpg

    So, out of the car and into the forest. But our forests are not like your forests. Strange things lurk there.

    Snakes? Some kind of alien snakes? Snakes crossed with trees?
    Snakes.jpg

    Lots of edible mushrooms in our forests. Here's one in the process of being edible:
    Shroom slug 01.jpg

    Oh, right. I forgot to tell you -- there was a massive moth hatch here a few weeks ago. But by the time we set off on this adventure, the hatch had grown, thrived, and died. Died, as in littering the ground everywhere. Tens -- probably hundreds -- of thousands of them. Well, more likely tens of millions. But we only saw a few thousand on this hike.
    Mothra 02.jpg

    And lest you think we were pioneering some desperate new route through untracked forest...
    Bridge. 02jpg.jpg

    And, having crossed the bridge, we soon came to our first view of Little Sliammon Lake. A lake from the shore of which we hoped to see new rock on the other side.
    Little Sliammon Lake.jpg

    Hmmm... No cliffs in sight. But maybe if we could paddle out into the middle of the lake we'd get a better view? Yeah, right, if only we had a canoe...
    Canoe 02.jpg

    Yup, someone had left a canoe there for hikers of the Sunshine Coast Trail to use. But it was pretty beat up (big dents everywhere) and I (former whitewater guide) decided it would be best just to leave it where it was.

    So we walked back out and drove home.

    Exploration of The Next Great Cliff is on the agenda for tomorrow. So check back in in two days.



  • Okay, today was real new route day. No, not in the sense that we did the first ascent of some amazing new climb, but rather that our exploration was wildly successful, and we found a great new crag...

    ...a crag within easy reach of home, and offering potential for probably a dozen climbs.

    Here we go. End of the road:
    20201006_120635.jpg

    What the forest is like here (v1)
    20201006_120736.jpg

    What the forest is like here (v2)
    20201006_122139.jpg

    The summit
    20201006_131343.jpg

    So, yeah, there we were. At a highpoint lookout on the Sunshine Coast Trail. We'd hiked up there before, but couldn't get a real view down the front side because it sloped off and we couldn't get close enough to the edge for a look down without risking death.

    So today we came back with ropes and gri-gris and ascenders and a desire to see what was below.

    Turned out to be 70 meters of steep granite. Solid rock, not much loose shit, and only moss to clean off (i.e. no cracks -- just face climbing).
    20201006_151216.jpg

    So we jugged back out and headed home.

    The local forecast is for about two weeks of rain, so it may be next spring before we go in for cleaning. Or, who knows, maybe we'll have a sunny November. We'll see...

    20201006_154908.jpg



  • Looks like a great place!



  • @NickG Hi Nick.

    Don't know about "great", but it will definitely be a good addition to the local climbing scene. As I think I have said here before, there are untouched acres of vertical granite all around us. Walls up to 4,500 ft, and a thousand small crags tucked away everywhere. The problem is that almost all of this wealth is inaccessible. Or, inaccessible without major time or expense. So any crag, even modest ones, that we can get to without either several days or a helicopter is big news.

    But the local climbing community was, until recently, stuck in the past. Thankfully, that is changing now. There are some incredibly keen young climbers, and a few ancient newcomers (like us), who are keen to look beyond what was done 20 years ago and see what might be done in the future.

    The little crag in my post above is a perfect example. A 20-minute drive from town, and a twenty-minute easy walk, puts you at the top. And that top is a much-loved scenic stopover on the Sunshine Coast Trail. Thousands of people have sat at the picnic table and had lunch without ever thinking about the possibility of what might lie over the edge just 25 feet away.

    But, the local 20-years-ago (and now deceased) hero apparently once checked it out and said something like "there might be one climb there." And so everyone else wrote it off.

    But, things are changing here, and, come spring, we will get on it with the wire brushes.



  • @David-Harris said in New Routing:

    @NickG Hi Nick.

    Don't know about "great", but it will definitely be a good addition to the local climbing scene. As I think I have said here before, there are untouched acres of vertical granite all around us. Walls up to 4,500 ft, and a thousand small crags tucked away everywhere. The problem is that almost all of this wealth is inaccessible. Or, inaccessible without major time or expense. So any crag, even modest ones, that we can get to without either several days or a helicopter is big news.

    But the local climbing community was, until recently, stuck in the past. Thankfully, that is changing now. There are some incredibly keen young climbers, and a few ancient newcomers (like us), who are keen to look beyond what was done 20 years ago and see what might be done in the future.

    The little crag in my post above is a perfect example. A 20-minute drive from town, and a twenty-minute easy walk, puts you at the top. And that top is a much-loved scenic stopover on the Sunshine Coast Trail. Thousands of people have sat at the picnic table and had lunch without ever thinking about the possibility of what might lie over the edge just 25 feet away.

    But, the local 20-years-ago (and now deceased) hero apparently once checked it out and said something like "there might be one climb there." And so everyone else wrote it off.

    But, things are changing here, and, come spring, we will get on it with the wire brushes.

    Sometimes it takes a bit of tough love to get a climb out of a heap but once the work is done the climbing can be great. Rumny used to be top rope back woods nothing until a new gang came to town. Problem was they did too good of a job and it got too busy and turned into a state climbing park..



  • @NickG Out here on the Pacific Coast it often takes more than just a bit of tough love, but, while this crag is covered with a fair bit of moss, that moss is easy to remove. Tedious work, but not difficult.

    Here is a shot of Mari cleaning her line, taken from the line I was scrubbing...

    Scrubbage.jpg

    And, while the climbing won't be world-class, it will be decent, and the views will make up for whatever the climbing lacks...

    The View.jpg

    And, whatever else you can say about new routing, it is hard work, so it is great to come home to...

    Waiting at home.jpg



  • Totally awesome. Such rewarding days!



  • Back today in a brief weather window to put in another anchor.

    There was nice light over Okeover Inlet to the northwest.

    Okeover Inlet.jpg

    And Mari setting up a rappel off equalized stumps (the anchors we've put in will replace this).

    Equalized stumps.jpg



  • looks like a really nice remote feeling place.


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