Where Is This ?



  • Post them up. photos that someone might be able to guess the route or location. I will start.
    The where is super easy on this one. I am looking for the actual route or formation that the photo was taken from.

    img102.jpg



  • while your at it name the rope.. Hint. it must have ben the only one Climb High was selling that year as I recall my first trip out west in 85ish with Charlie Gray we both had the exact same rope which made pulling rappels a complete PINTA.



  • Bearing in mind I have not climbed in the Tetons much, & not since about 1983, I'm guessing we are looking south at the hight point of the Grand Teton, with Mt Owen at right, from Symetry Spire.

    And of course the rope brand is Edelweiss.

    Or not.



  • your way to low down for symmetry. look and the pansy baby blue color of the rope...



  • Initial shoot from the hip was Edelrid. Then I thought Mammut. Your baby blue "hint" makes me thing maybe Bluewater but I am not sure if they were around then, at least West Coast.

    Educational Psychology would advise going w/first "guess/impression" in a absence of actually knowing when taking multiple choice tests. I climbed mostly on Mammut and Beal/Chouinard myself.

    We shall see what we shall see... Party on, Wayne!



  • I would say the photo is from Guides Wall. in the foreground is the Run Don't Walk, the N. Face of the Grand, and the summit of the Middle Teton on the right.



  • @Scole said in Where is this ?:

    I would say the photo is from Guides Wall. in the foreground is the Run Don't Walk, the N. Face of the Grand, and the summit of the Middle Teton on the right.

    The voice of experience and expertise speaks. My bets are on @Scole 👍



  • Bet you don't know the story behind Guides Wall. Take a guess.

    🤔



  • @jgill lets hear the story from you



  • I know its another Pownal/Gilkey classic. Both were guides, so my guess it was first done by two guides on their day off



  • you guys were super close. Just a bit lower in the canyon. Baxters. the hint on the rope should have been the Pansy baby blue color. French of course Beal. I actually never say that color in other ropes at the time. Bright red, orange, navy blue and forest green seemed to be the colors of choice for elderide and the rest of the bunch. Climb High was the big importer for the NE and many of the smaller shops got their inventory from them. Very heavily brittish, My first shoes were EBs and my harness was Pat Littlejohn.



  • @NickG Baxter's was my second guess, but I thought it was lost. I just couldn't figure out where you would find that angle on Baxter's.



  • we did the 5.6 SE? ridge w/ corners for several pitches then you end of on a big shelf and have one 25m hard pitch to the summit. That shot was obviously one of the belays on the easier part of the route. The view from Guides wall is much closer to tewionot and the grand.

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  • @NickG said in Where is this ?:

    you guys were super close. Just a bit lower in the canyon. Baxters. the hint on the rope should have been the Pansy baby blue color. French of course Beal. I actually never say that color in other ropes at the time. Bright red, orange, navy blue and forest green seemed to be the colors of choice for elderide and the rest of the bunch. Climb High was the big importer for the NE and many of the smaller shops got their inventory from them. Very heavily brittish, My first shoes were EBs and my harness was Pat Littlejohn.

    Interesting. Maybe a bit earlier than '85? I recall Beal being most solid colors w/some "speckles" added for accent, as contrasted w/tricolor stripes patterns. The 80's were favoring the "New Wave" colors like pink, turquoise, purple/lavenders and such, e.g. Chouinard "Black Fantasia" (wh/I suspect @FritzRay likely has a shot of from his catalog collection?). My Beals were branded Chouinard, however, so maybe different aesthetics, to Chouinard specs than the Beal branded line. Loved the "hand" of the Beals.

    I recall Edelrid and Edelweiss favored the bold tricolor stripes, yellows, reds and such, and now that you mention it, the forest greens and oranges of Edelweiss? Somebody once told me the darker colors were favored in the Alpine/Mountaineering folks because they would dry faster after becoming damp or wet.

    My recollection is Mammut favored blues. Hence my Mammut second guess.

    Oh well, think that was three strikes for Toby. Shows ya' what I know... 😜



  • I rediscovered Baxter's Pinnacle in the 1950s by noticing a shadow from across Jenny Lake. It had been lost for years. I told Chouinard about it and he and Weeks(?) went up and did it using a bit of aid. I went up later and did the FFA, then some time after that did the left face of the aid crack, which may have been the first 5.10 in the Park.

    The Guides Wall was first climbed by Pownall and Gilkey in the late 1940s and received some attention I suppose up to the mid 1950s. Up to that time the guides from Exum/Petzolt were the top rock climbers in the Tetons - Pownall (who I really liked and respected), Corbett, Breitenbach, Unsold, etc. Then California climbers began showing up - Chouinard, Weeks, and a few others, a little later, Royal and his followers - and suddenly the guides were no longer the most revered! Even I had a little to do with that; apart from bouldering at Jenny Lake and lengthier solos at Blacktail Butte, I would grab a partner every few days and hike up to Garnet Canyon and do some unclimbed ridge or buttress, usually avoiding the simplest line and bouldering a bit in the air.

    Corbett had climbed the Direct Jensen Ridge on Symmetry - the top rock climb in the Park up to the mid fifties - doing what he called the new "crux" pitch. So I went up and did the crux pitch four different ways, just for the hell of it. You get the idea.

    The guides were a tad upset by all of this - actually kind of panicked - and they launched themselves onto the Guides Wall with a vengeance. After that the climb with its variations became popular, and the guides had something to take pride in.

    It would be great if another Teton climber from that era would show up here and give their version of this historical nugget. But I am 82 and not many from that time are still with us. Chouinard, certainly, but he's a Luddite! 😎



  • jgill! Baxter's Pinnacle was my first ever Teton Climb. Summer of 1978, my girlfriend Jennifer & I wandered up it. We had a guidebook, but I remember very little, except that you had done the FFA. Per my looking at my 1965 condensed Ortenburger's "A climbers guide to the Teton Range," we did some easier varient of the South Ridge. I confess to not knowing where my photos, if any, are.

    By contrast, when we climbed Symmetry Spire the next day, I shot some photos, which are also lost for now, & I was impressed with the length of the route, for a "Teton beginer's route." I think we intended to climb the Southwest Ridge. I was also impressed with the amount of big loose flakes on it. Nothing much matched with the guidebook.



  • Baxters was my first roped teton climb as well . Martha on the hike in.

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  • @J-Fengel

    Nobody going to take a guess at J Fengel's climb? Looks like a granite slab to me, but the foliage below is different from the foliage below the slabs at Squamish where I first climbed.



  • J fengal I will make a wild guess despite never being in California even once.. Royal arches???

    here is one that will actually be quite obvious to anyone who was there in the early 80s...

    img109.jpg


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