JT Changes



  • https://www.desertsun.com/story/news/environment/2019/10/18/whats-new-joshua-tree-national-park/3826563002/

    Saw this on MP and thought I'd cross post it here. Used to love JT before it became a NP.



  • @johntp You got that shit right, driver! It will always be "The Monument" to me.



  • I'm glad I had my time there, but, like Yosemite Valley, I don't think I'll ever go back. Three million effin' visitors per year? No thanks. RIP JT.



  • @BAd-clYmber said in JT Changes:

    I'm glad I had my time there, but, like Yosemite Valley, I don't think I'll ever go back. Three million effin' visitors per year? No thanks. RIP JT.

    Pretty much how I feel. We were indeed fortunate to have experienced so many places before the hordes and their freaking generators took over. Yos, JT, the Tetons, SEKI and so many others when you could roll in on a Friday evening and have no problem finding a site. It was quiet and peaceful instead of the constant drone of a dozen RV generators running from 6AM to 10 PM. God, I hate those things.



  • @johntp said in JT Changes:

    We were indeed fortunate to have experienced so many places before the hordes and their freaking generators took over. Yos, JT, the Tetons, SEKI and so many others when you could roll in on a Friday evening and have no problem finding a site.

    And there still are places where you can climb on beautiful rock in fabulous landscapes with no crowds. Unfortunately -- or maybe fortunately -- you can't just "roll in on a Friday evening."

    Places like Yosemite, JT, the Tetons, Squamish, etc were unusual in that they combined great climbing with easy access. Paved roads, groomed campsites (i.e. with tables), toilet facilities, bars and restaurants either right there or close by... And all this within an easy drive from major population centers.

    We -- the old guys who post on sites like this one -- were lucky to be young and keen to climb at a time when all that was available, but relatively few people took advantage of it. Now? Well, what did we expect? That we would have these places to ourselves forever?

    But for those who are young and keen to climb now, there is still an almost endless array of places with the combination of great climbing and great location. What's missing, at least for most people, is the easy access, paved roads, toilets, bars, restaurants, groomed campsites...

    But maybe that's not such a bad thing. Maybe having to work hard to get to a climbing paradise makes one's time there all the sweeter.

    And, as a kind of afterthought, there are still a few places that do offer that old combination. Think about the Needles. Or Cochise Stronghold. Maybe things have changed in the ten years since I last visited those two, but they both offered magnificent climbing in staggeringly beautiful locations, were easy to get to, and we had them almost to ourselves.



  • You keep talking about the good old days and some millennial is going to use the phrase which is code-speak for "old people are no longer relevant and need not be listened to" (pm me).

    I have a 4WD and a roster of places that I can show up to to climb on a Friday night with nobody else there, but here is the thing;,...... I'M RETIRED. I CAN GO ANY NIGHT I LIKE.



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  • I'm with Toker V. I avoid going to popular outdoor spots on weekends.


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