Vintage Gear



  • @NickG

    Never used a Snarg. Any good? I kinda thought the Lowe's tube stuff looked iffy. Had one of Forrest's hammers with a tube pick and it sucked. Maybe good for cauliflower, but painful on WI.



  • the tube picks sucked! I used my humming bird tube pick exactly once. the other pointy pick that came with the humming bird was pretty decent if fragile. . Snargs were decent in frozen turf. usually sucked in ice.

    old stuff0042.jpg



  • @NickG

    HaHaHa! Gave me a good laugh. Thanks.



  • I took a 100' fall onto a 6" Snarg which went to the eye on the first tap when I broke a free hanging icicle and rode it down. If that Snarg didn't hold it would have ripped the belay too. Before modern screws Snargs were often the quickest ice pro to place, and I have experienced one holding a giant whipper.



  • Well,.. I have some cool old stuff, but trying to post photos here is too frustrating, and instructions from people that don't realize that saying something as simple as "go to" is not self explanatory.

    (see I didn't use the J word again)



  • ron. posting photos is pretty easy if you click on the cloud on the far right . its just right of the smiley face. they do need to be resized before you do that though which I do in photo shop. Don't know how other folks do it.

    Scole. I had a mixed rack of snrgs, Chiounard screws and a few crappy salewas.. Sometimes the Snargs went in ok. other times they were a real SOB to place. I can remember swinging the hammer with both hands , 20 below zero while clipped in to my other tool dangeling with huge fall if it blew.. pretty much toasted by the time you got the thing in. Once I had one pull out just with the rope drag when I climbed by. I certainly had a love hate relationship with them.. I never took an ice fall until the modern screw era... 😉



  • How about some vintage clothing?

    Vintage clothing.jpg

    Stylin' it in the late 70s.



  • @David-Harris

    Classic in so many ways. The only thing missing is a goldline rope. Squamish?



  • From 1969 to 1974, I climbed in Levis & a cotton t-shirt or long-sleeved cotton shirt. After I bought into an outdoor shop in 1973, I could afford Patagonia clothing.

    Here's Chris, who could afford wool knickers, & me, waiting out a thunderstorm in 1971 in the Wind River Range.
    Ray & Chris The Sphinx small.jpg



  • @FritzRay

    Did Patagonia exist then? Thought it was GPIW. Galibier boots? Had a pair of Super Guides; pretty sweet boots.



  • @johntp said in Vintage Gear:

    Classic in so many ways. The only thing missing is a goldline rope. Squamish?

    No kidding. Climbing walls in wool knickers and leather mountaineering boots. What a trip. And yes, that shot was on Tantalus Wall, on the Chief at Squamish.

    As to goldline... don't even want to talk about that. Did you ever do a free-hanging rappel on goldline? Instant ticket to nausea. The farther down you go, the faster you spin. Yeah, okay, it was nylon, so far safer than the hemp ropes it replaced, but fuck...

    Edit to add: As to the jacket, it was some kind of treated cotton. Treated with what? Dunno. Wax? Oil? Whatever, it was supposedly water repellent.



  • @David-Harris said in Vintage Gear:

    @johntp said in Vintage Gear:

    Classic in so many ways. The only thing missing is a goldline rope. Squamish?

    No kidding. Climbing walls in wool knickers and leather mountaineering boots. What a trip. And yes, that shot was on Tantalus Wall, on the Chief at Squamish.

    As to goldline... don't even want to talk about that. Did you ever do a free-hanging rappel on goldline? Instant ticket to nausea. The farther down you go, the faster you spin. Yeah, okay, it was nylon, so far safer than the hemp ropes it replaced, but fuck...

    Yes, have done the goldline spin. Did a dulfersitz with it as well wearing a t-shirt. Umm, learned from that one.



  • So, just so y'all don't think I stopped keeping up with climbing fashion, here's a snapshot from a decade later.

    Mountaineering rather than walls this time, but still stylish...

    (It's the red wool socks that are the key to building the perfect climbing look)

    Definitive underwear.jpg

    Summit of Mt Sir Frances Drake in the BC Coast Range.



  • The first rope I bought, in August 1969 was a goldline, from REI. The only photo I have of it in action, is of my always "well-dressed," but now deceased, pal, Gordon on our Tyrolian Traverse on Mt. Reagan, Aug 1970 in Idaho's Sawtooth Mountains.

    Gordon Mt. Reagan 1970.jpg

    I always hated the rough feel of Goldline ropes.



  • By 1976, on Cascade Couloir near Baniff, I was finally fashionable, with Chouinard rigid crampons, Galibier double-boots, Patagonia wool knickers, & Foamback top, Jensen pack, Chouinard axe & hammer, & an Ultimate helmet.

    Wind_02_015-small.JPG



  • @johntp Per your question: "Did Patagonia exist then? Thought it was GPIW"

    I confess, Patagonia Software does not show up as a brand in a Chouinard Great Pacific Iron Works catalog, until his 1978-79 catalog.

    But I know he was selling Patagonia Software by 1975. My long-saved wool-knickers have a Patagonia label in them & they do show up in an early edition of his 1975 - 77 catalog, with a photo of Machapuchare in Nepal, by Tom Frost, on the cover.
    GPIW_front 1975-77 chouinard catalog cover.jpg



  • @FritzRay said in Vintage Gear:

    By 1976, on Cascade Couloir near Baniff, I was finally fashionable,

    When you're hot, you're hot!



  • My avatar pic sporting high style:

    Stand Up Shorts.jpg



  • Could be out in left field here, but I was told as a lad in the Boy Scouts that "something red" was a preferred due to its signaling value should things go sideways. Ditto other bright "notice me" colors. I suspect fashion considerations and cool full color catalog shots likely had about as much, if not more to do with it? 😜



  • I remember doing the Bard-Harrington in Lee Vining Canyon with Roy McClenahan years ago. He placed one snarg so deep I could barely see the biner sticking out of the ice. It took me ten minutes to chop it out: That sucker was going nowhere.


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