Random Photo Thread



  • @Scole

    Alas, I was a college student replacing an SR Semi Pro that had been stolen and lacked the requisite funds to hang it with a Record Gruppo so I went with the Gran Sport. Bill Samoan, then owner of Bill's Bike Shop in Camarillo was pretty into the road racing scene and built the bike for me. Bill suggested the aluminum based Gran Sport Gruppo for my use as a more durable option compared to the more "exotic" magnesium blends used in the Record. I am not sure the titanium based Super Record stuff existed yet? Hmm....

    In any case, it's all original except for a Record brake lever, replaced by a local bike shop, raided from one of the owner's vintage bikes, when they mysteriously lost mine during a service. Also fucked up my rear cluster. Replaced it w/a flat lander road racer/criterium rig that is worthless if you ever need to climb a hill and don't have telephone poles for legs. As I am sure you are aware, SD is great hill climbing country w/all those ravines and mesas and Bill had my rig set up appropriately. Oh yeah, I put enough miles on it way bitd to "sharpen the teeth" of the first set of chainrings so replaced those on Bill's advice so as to not stretch out my chains as quickly. Chainrings were replaced w/original Campy Gran Sport stuff.

    Lesson being don't let anyone who's never touched anything other than Japanese stuff work on your vintage Italian rig even if they assure you they know what they're doing. If you don't see it hanging up on the wall... likely they don't. Speaking of which, I was once offered $3K when I took it in for service by Fairbanks, AK shop owner who had a nice vintage collection. Needed money at the time so was tempted. Now glad I did not. And lest I hijack the "Random Photo Thread"... Geronimo! Here's a pic:

    IMG_5900.jpg

    colnago_blues.jpg

    So, yeah, it's a cool thing to have. I go stare at it and wax nostalgic fer' the good ol' days from time to time. 🚴

    P.S.; As for the SR Semi Pro... I recovered it one day when I was shopping for a room to rent when, no shit, there it was, leaning up against a wall in the living room. I said; "Hey, that's my bike!" Guy showing me the room replied; "No it's not, it's my roommate's." After a bit of back and forth I was picking up their phone to call the cops and recited the serial number, which I'd memorized because it was my then ATM card's pin (yeah, they used to be much longer than four chars). He figured out I was not joking and dead serious so checked the bottom bracket and asked for a repeat. Lo and behold I was spot on! Still recall thirty plus years later: MOJ60288, or damn close. Whereupon the dude got a pretty worried look on his face and told me to "just take it". Needless to say... they didn't offer me the room. Turns out the room mate was a classmate "friend" at UCSD. I loathe thieves and damn tempted to reveal his name here but we all make mistakes so hopefully he's become a better person since those days. Thief had turned it into a "beach/boardwalk" cruiser and it was pretty thrashed. I had my Colnago by then so gave it to my bro, who got Bill's to fix 'er up. Still rides it to this day!



  • That is a beautiful ride. Hang on to it



  • I foolishly sold my Guerciotti one season when I was broke and wanted to climb every day. Then a couple of years later I inherited my Viner from a friend who died in a car crash. He was a bike mechanic, and had converted it to a touring bike with 650 b wheels, a drilled out SR crankset to accommodate a third chainring, and some Cane Creek Brakes. As another friend and former bike shop owner says "it's a Ferrari with fenders". I have a carbon fiber Trek, but it doesn't have the feel of Italian steel



  • @Scole Yeah, they do have a "feel" to 'em, don't they? Also last forever. Or damn near presuming you're not a Class 1 rider logging 500+ mile weeks. I needed to study every spare moment so only logged about half that. Less prior to midterms and finals. Bit more during summer months. Used to jump railroad tracks with the thing. Cranked Torrey Pines many times. Not the main road but the switchbacks up the back side. Also Decker and Topanga Canyons on "long day" hundred mile run loops. Santa Cruz mountains. All those great hills 'twixt the Pacific and the inland valleys. Sustained uphill cranks followed by slaloms down the backsides and some grand endorphin rushes. Rainy days would be actually depressing cuz you needed that 'fix'.

    Some great riding bitd before too crowded w/nut job drivers. Probably take your life in your hands to ride that stuff now. Was once enjoying a leisurely view run down LaJolla Hill when a Porsche honked at me from behind so I flipped him the bird, tucked and slalomed away. Much to his ego's surprise his $100K car had no chance he was cornering that tight as fast as I could. Heh. Yeah, young, fit as fuck, and w/a grand smorgasbord of awesome riding territory before the traffic turned into a nightmare.

    Awesome that you had a Geurciotti. Ann, one of my Pacific Beach house mates who did have legs like telephone poles (Taekwondo black belt/instructor) had one. Beautifully crafted. Those Italians did it all by hand brazing too - no production robotics. Sigh.. don't make 'em like they used to.

    Yeah, cycling and craggin' were my two greatest passions in this life. 🚴 ⛰

    Alas, my cycling oriented kid is into mountain biking and never even taken the Colnago for a spin. 🚵 Probably for the best the way folks drive hereabouts. Don't even pull over fer' emergency vehicles. Seriously.

    Disclaimer: If you're tempted to go jumping railroad tracks, make damn sure you've got what it takes to clear that second rail cuz if your rear tire hits it you'll be in fer' some extra bike handling excitement and maybe some nasty road rash, especially if anything less than perfectly centered/balanced. Ditto for any sand before and after the rails a fast moving train may have kicked up.



  • I used to ride Tioga Pass from Mammoth, then go bouldering, then ride home. One day on the Guerciotti I was headed home down the pass when I came up on a Corvette headed down too. Just below Blue Slide are several tight turns I called the Slingshot Turns. I took him on the inside and blew past like he was stopped. The look in the guys eyes was worth a fortune. When he finally caught me in the flats he gave me ten fingers, seven times, plus two more. 72 mph on silk sewups with no helmet might be the high point of my riding career.



  • @toby said in Random Photo Thread:

    Disclaimer: If you're tempted to go jumping railroad tracks, make damn sure you've got what it takes to clear that second rail cuz if your rear tire hits it you'll be in fer' some extra bike handling excitement and maybe some nasty road rash, especially if anything less than perfectly centered/balanced. Ditto for any sand before and after the rails a fast moving train may have kicked up.

    I rolled a tire crossing train tracks on a beautiful chrome Mondia Especial. It was 731 Reynolds and folded up like a taco, but man was that an awesome ride



  • @toby said in Random Photo Thread:

    Disclaimer: If you're tempted to go jumping railroad tracks, make damn sure you've got what it takes to clear that second rail cuz if your rear tire hits it you'll be in fer' some extra bike handling excitement and maybe some nasty road rash

    Jumping railroad tracks, or jumping anything else, is one thing. Failing to jump whatever it was is quite another.

    In my most recent "failing to jump" event, the object was a six-inch-high concrete divider which I didn't see until it was to late too get the front wheel up. I had more than enough speed to clear the six-foot width of the divider (and then some), but several of the judges downgraded my score for only completing half of the front flip and landing on my head. And this despite the fact that the nice lady who witnessed the whole thing (and swabbed off a lot of the blood) said that I'd gone really high!

    But the really sad part of the whole show (well, other than the six months of pain), was the loss of my two-wheeled steed. A custom-built beauty that I had been riding almost every day for thirty years...

    Bent steel 01.jpg

    Bent steel 02.jpg

    Interestingly, there was no damage to the front wheel or the forks, which survived by transmitting the force to the top tube and down tube, both of which buckled.



  • @David-Harris

    Cool story. Not to minimize the loss your trusty steed. Rarely see those old school leather Brooks saddles. Kind of comfy. I wonder if they're still made?

    One of the sweet things about "old school steel" is that it bends rather than snaps. Shudder to contemplate what how long you may have been laid up with an aluminum frame cuz they snap rather than bend (wonder about carbon fiber?). !Aye, caramba! Glad your still here, mon! Sounds like things could have been a lot worse. 🤕

    Suspect those of us who've logged the miles probably all have our horror stories. I 'm not without mine but been luckier than most given how much I used to ride.

    Hmm... Methinks it may also be about time to fork off a "Bicycle Head Thread"....



  • Mari on Sunshine Breakfast p3 01.jpg



  • @David-Harris Nice! 🐕

    Stellar image quality there. Are you using a cell phone or dedicated SLR digital camera?



  • @toby said in Random Photo Thread:

    Stellar image quality there. Are you using a cell phone or dedicated SLR digital camera?

    Neither. That photo was taken 16 years ago, before I had a cell phone, and I've never owned a digital SLR. At that time I was using a Nikon Coolpix point-and-shoot as my climbing camera.

    Pretty much any cell phone you can buy now has higher resolution, and most probably have better lenses, but, for its time, the Coolpix was pretty good.



  • Half Dome.jpg



  • 45b.JPG

    Sasha DiGiulian as seen on a makeup store in Rome a month ago. Must be hard to climb with all of that makeup on!



  • @Scole,
    a moist absorbing advertisement (very European)

    More Than "Just Another Pretty Face" you can join with Sasha this October for 5 days of sport clamping

    Or, as friends of mine have done for years, go on your own for 2 weeks and mingle. Sasha is a very impressive person.

    Only A Few Heard It ~ When The Hammer Came Down . . .

    The 3-mile long ridge, rising here to 300 ft tall, bullet-hard, still full of opportunities but not the middle
    IMG_2898_ 970x565.jpg
    A steep fun section, closed at the base in 2008(?) the middle of The Near Trapps. a major cliff at The Gunks NY.

    After the discovery of the multiple dubious Titles, faked claims

    & nefarious actions such as re-cut & erroneously surveyed parcels,

    that indicated a regular pattern of attempted theft of property by deception

    perpetrated by majority landowner, or their proxy,

    came to the attention of "some people's children"

    The general public & members of the proxy's club "The Mohonk Preserve"

    lost access to much of the base of what is pictured.

    A shorter walk, It was always just as much fun to rap in from the top.
    IMG_2897_1000x750.jpg
    Lost World Direct. The pitch starts from a belay at the pasted flakes then moves up across the slab/face to the break 40 feet right of the bush above the smallest block.
    I know, ~what a blurry image~. There are so few pictures of me climbing

    LstWrldD700x980.jpg

    & this was once one of the best. Water & age damage but It is a proud picture of me on a still rarely climbed line.

    It is wrong of me to say but as it is with so many areas that have had been regulated, upgraded &/or restricted by changing climbers access,
    I'm so lucky and glad that I got mine before the closures and restrictions.



  • @The-Gnome

    WTF, Gnome! You seem to have many access related issues in your neck of the woods. Maybe we need an "Access Thread"? Have you ever broached any of the issues you've alluded to with The Access Fund? Admittedly I don't know much about them other than their existence via their ubiquitous signs all over JTree but from their name, at least, it would seem stuff like this should be pretty congruent with their mission.

    And, yeah, agreed that I am also so glad that I got mine before the madness took over, e.g. City of Rocks. The "Freedom of the Hills" is naught any longer. Sad state of affairs for our children.



  • @toby said

    And, yeah, agreed that I am also so glad that I got mine before the madness took over, e.g. City of Rocks. The "Freedom of the Hills" is naught any longer. Sad state of affairs for our children.

    It was our comments about the "Improvements" At Stanley Lake . . .
    with all the comfortizing deemed necessary due to the popularity & camping regulations that help preserve the wilderness
    at the cost of & the loss of true freedom of the hills that has reached all the way to your back yard that made me think to post.

    Having a group of lawyers advocating for the Yo-Yo hoard, while at the same time harboring secret interests . . . so using climber access as the point of a spear to secure amazingly unique locations for themselves,
    well . . . You're getting to recognize the double edge of the No-Access fund. In many instances, they have saved excellent climbing opportunities.
    All while & at the same time they have been behind some land grabs that have made for some very legitimate concerns.

    If there is an up-side, It made me dig deep & I found This from 'Josh' back in '88? I think
    385222_18872_XL-2_976x700.jpg

    There were a few others that I'll have to scan.



  • @The-Gnome said in Random Photo Thread:

    I know what a blurry image. There are so few pictures of me climbing & this was once one of the best. Water & age damage but It is a proud picture of me on a still rarely climbed line.
    ![0_1566406464416_BlueGusChmny'NJ 5_700x980.jpg](Uploading 100%)

    ^^^^ Now, this image upload fail is not a glitch but rather due to the file name using a disallowed character. In this instance, please remove the apostrophe preceding the NJ, i.e. change the image file name to be more sane (cuz just because johnny come lately M$ and Apple broke the previously long standing rules w.r.t. filename conventions in the name of "convenience and ease of use" for the less than technical mass markets does not mean that the sane folks of the Unix and Linux worlds followed suit). But I digress... Enough computer lore history.....

    tl;dr:

    Don't use "special characters" that are commonly used in various programming language syntax, e.g.:

    • ~
    • !
    • ' "
    • ; :
    • [ ] { } ( )
    • .. ..\ ../ --
    • Nor various other "top row shift" chord stuff like backtics ( ` ), $, *, % and such.

    And since I am on the subject of file names.... Spaces are not indicators of the nefarious but can be generally kind of sucky too. Maybe opt for CamelCase, underscores, or hyphens instead, e.g. "my very long file name with many spaces.jpg" becomes:

    • MyVeryLongFileNameWithManySpaces.jpg
    • my_very_long_file_name_with_many_spaces.jpg
    • my-very-long-file-name-with-many-spaces.jpg

    CamelCase is popular with various programmer religions because it shortens to fewest characters. In my opinion the hyphen option results in the best "readability" and ergonomics. Exercise caution, however, to not incorporate two consecutive hyphens, as that emulates program syntax. Underscores are pretty sweet readability wise but can be difficult to discern from spaces on some displays and also require a "Shift chord" so a bit more work to type.

    Clear as mud?

    Hope this helps. Rock on o/ 🐕



  • @toby
    Doh___! Thnx ! for remedial posting instruction.



  • Losing My Mind for Chinookie!

    chinookienookie.jpg

    Happy RTT!!

    Wear 'em if ya' got 'em!

    One of my all time faves that I finally got around to replacing after gifting it's predecessor away to my nephew. Pic snapped whilst chatting with my wife last night, so nope, I am not boozin' it up this early in the day.



  • The view from Mt Tyr.jpg


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